A list of my life’s most significant events in relation to my weight

By Michelle Flores

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  1. When I looked my healthiest (read: thinnest), I was 16 years old. I was 180 pounds. I was swimming 2-5 hours a day. I ate nothing with a high cholesterol count because I was taking Accutane and I couldn’t let the side effects take away my chance at perfect skin. (Here’s the catch; my acne came back with a vengeance sophomore year of college.)
  2. In college, after gaining the freshman 15, I tried to lose weight again. A few months into this process, my father called me in a disorientated panic. My mother had to be hospitalized because of a brain tumor. She needed emergency surgery. I couldn’t see her until the next day because the last flight from Tallahassee left 20 minutes before he called me. When I finally made it to the hospital, she didn’t recognize me. I gained 20 more pounds, thereby making it over my 200 pound threshold.
  3. When I was in my first year at NYU, I maintained my weight at a solid 220. I walked 5-10 miles a day. I ate cafeteria meals twice a day. Regular dinners consisted of pickle back whiskey shots and dive bar DJs in Williamsburg.
  4. When my mother died, Fridays and Saturdays were a haze of post work shots, free beers, and midnight “Don’t tell me your name I don’t want to know you” hookups.


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Cover to Cover with . . . Jules Henderson

By Jordan Blum & Jules Henderson

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Jules Henderson is a Writing MFA candidate at the University of San Francisco where she studies under D.A. Powell, Bruce Snider, Brynn Saito, and Rachel Richardson. Her work has appeared at The Paradise Review, The Bookends Review, The Social Poet, The Drunken Odyssey, and in Words Fly Away, a collection of poems that address the 2011 Fukushima disaster. 

In this episode of Cover to Cover with . . ., Editor-in-Chief Jordan Blum chats with Henderson about her piece “Ad Vitam,” studying under such accomplished writers, the intersectionality of poetry and music, and more!

– Jules Henderson

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How Tears Were Made

By Susan Leary

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And there appeared a great wonder in heaven;
a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet,
and upon her head a crown of twelve stars.
–Revelation, 12:1

It is but an assumption—Mary, in readying herself to
die, began to cradle the earth in her feet. Remedy for
flesh and bone as fragrant as the blooms that dared to
endure in August. As in the third hour—but all the time,
more endured than imagined: white poppy, hyacinth,
dandelion. That Mary forgot not the pink of her finger
and thumb once able to fathom thorns into roses for
plucking. Stars from within the splintering of the cross.
What better to impart unto paradise but the attendance
of her eyes? The eternalness of dirt on her tongue?
For Mary knew, upon seeing the very fact of her face,
God would reap sympathy for the Heavens. How deftly
He moved the blood, the bile, the vessels: the spit. How
deftly too the Heavens misted at Mary’s composure.
That from her rib—an epiphany, of grass, soil, root, germ:
rain. So it is more than an assumption—Helen, in cupping
the sting of her husband’s suicide in her hands, beheld
Mary, but once, weeping at the altar.

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Koko

By John Greiner

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The bearded lady
at the freak show
Coney Island
never got your
pharaoh fame
and now that
Koko the Killer Clown is dead
the freak show is not
worth the $5 admission
there is no guide
and jester left
to give meaning
to the front house receipts
…………queen/king
…………this is
…………a revolutionary age
of transgressive days
where from the top
of the Wonder Wheel
you can see
…………the Nile
and the green valleys

John Greiner

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Interview w/ Mindy Kronenberg

By Carol Smallwood

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Mindy Kronenberg is the publisher and editor of Book/Mark: A Quarterly Small Press Review (located in Miller Place, New York.) It welcomes inquiries and 500-950 word reviews of small press books, which it publishes in hard copy. Mindy’s work appears in many journals and anthologies. Feel free to email her at cyberpoet@optonline.net.

When did Book/Mark: A Quarterly Small Press Review begin? What are some of the places it has archived?

We’ve been around since 1994, and archived with the NY Public Library, Poets House in NYC, William and Mary College (Williamsburg, Virginia). We’re also listed with the Critics Circle Guide, International Directory of Little Magazines and Small Presses, The Writer’s Handbook (distributed through the Suffolk Cooperative Library System) and the Community of Literary Magazines and Pressed (CLMP).

What kinds of books are reviewed, including nonfiction, poetry, and others? Have you seen a rise in memoir?

We are very eclectic and like to bring attention to a variety of genres/styles coming out of the small and independent press arena: poetry, fiction, criticism, nonfiction, history, politics, science, children’s literature, and yes, memoir. There has been great interest in memoir and personal narratives. We also include books from university presses, cooperative publishers, and occasionally, self-published books that deserve attention.…

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